Monday, July 27, 2015

Dormition Fast Calendar Printable and Lesson Plan

Briefly, this is my lesson plan for a class at our mission this week on the Dormition. We have all of our kids in one class, so its a challenge to try to keep everyone's attention and not let the noise level get out of control! I'm thinking of telling the story with flannelgraph this week - can't wait!

Dormition Fast Lesson:

1. Start with songs and finger plays (“It is truly meet,” “this is the church…” “Our Father”
2. Teach kids to sing refrain, “Most holy Theotokos, save us,” for the paraklesis. 
3. Tell the story of the Dormition in an exciting way.
4. What does it mean? God raised her up and took her to heaven, and he will someday do that for all the faithful. 
5. Give kids Dormition Calendar with instructions to color one flower per day to count the days of the fast and celebrate the feast. 
6. Challenge children to bring flowers to the church for Christ and his mother on the feast of the Dormition (Saturday, August 15, or the next Sunday if their family can’t come).  
7. Give kids a letter to parents also, explaining about the calendar and the flower challenge. 



Grab the Dormition Fast calendar png above, or print the pdf below. 

 

"Finally it must be stressed that, in all of the feasts of the Virgin Mother of God in the Church, the Orthodox Christians celebrate facts of their own lives in Christ and the Holy Spirit. What happens to Mary happens to all who imitate her holy life of humility, obedience, and love. With her all people will be “blessed” to be “more honorable than the cherubim and beyond compare more glorious than the seraphim” if they follow her example. All will have Christ born in them by the Holy Spirit. All will become temples of the living God. All will share in the eternal life of His Kingdom who live the life that Mary lived."

Monday, July 13, 2015

Dormition Fast Paper Flower Craft

 I made these 3-D paper flowers last year, using whatever construction paper I had at the time. I made 15 flowers so we could add one more to the jar each day of the Dormition Fast with a daily reading.

Unfortunately, I was sick most of the fast, and we only made it half way through. I found the flowers recently and so I'm hoping to use them this year.

I got the idea from these two posts with flower crafts for the Theotokos: A Flowery Frame and Dormition Calendar Craft (with Scripture readings)

A tiny tutorial on my paper flowers are below. I sorta just made them up as I went, but I think they turned out okay.

Wednesday, June 17, 2015

Teaching the Eucharist to Children


I put together this lesson on the Eucharist with a little zine for our kids at church. I tried to make the book appropriate for a broad age range. It simply explains the Eucharist, with quotes from the services, and bubbles telling the children ways they can participate in the Liturgy, with an image to color on each page.





It prints on one page. Fold the paper in half, in half again and in half again, then cut  just the center vertical fold. Then you can fold it into a zine. More precise instructions are here. I love this easy zine template and make books for my kids frequently with it. 



Grab the png above or the pdf with teaching notes is embedded below. Print at actual size (not scale to fit).


Sunday, June 7, 2015

Many years, Mary!

As many of you as have been baptized into Christ, have put on Christ. Alleluia.
















"It is the story of Christ, and it is the duty and joy of every Christian to know and teach this story. When children are baptized into this narrative, they become part of it. The stories of the patriarchs, the judges, the kings, the prophets, the apostles, the saints who followed them, and of Christ Himself, become their stories." - source

"Every child knows when it is loved; every child responds to affection and tenderness. An infant may not be able to articulate any of that in a rational, conscious way, but that doesn’t mean that the child has no understanding of life’s most important intimacies. And if all infants, at some level, comprehend and react to human love, surely every child can do the same with the love of the Most Holy Trinity." - source


Friday, June 5, 2015

All Saints Sunday

I put together this lesson for our kids at church for All Saints Sunday, but it could also make a nice patron saint lesson. The printable includes:

1. the epistle reading for All Saints Sunday and some notes I used to prepare.
2. (and page 5) Two saint pages for children to fill in with the name of their saint, why they are a saint, and how to be like them. A box for drawing the saint is there with light lines to help young children get started. (the second page doesn't have the "St." so it can be used for the Theotokos, angels, or other saints with different titles.)
3. I didn't use the third page, but it is an extra printable with a space to draw all of your favorite saints, or perhaps your family's saints around Christ enthroned.
4. The next page has 12 circles of Christ enthroned meant to be cut out and pasted on a paper plate, and then, like number 3, you can draw saints around. We didn't get to this either.


nts

Pentecost



Feast Day: 50 days after Pascha
Liturgical color: Green
Liturgical offering: greenery for the church
Themes:
Special prayers: Kneeling Prayers

Around the web:
Festal Learning Basket from Charming the Birds from the Trees
On Ancient Faith Radio:






We found this pretty green tree frog while out cutting greenery for church.
Lou named him Fifty Nifty.



Thursday, June 4, 2015

St. Simeon and the Meeting of the Lord Scroll project

I'm way behind sharing this, but perhaps others will find it useful for next year. St. Simeon is dad's patron saint, so we wanted to have a little craft and lesson about him. We talked about St. Simeon's work on the septuagint, and how he had waited a long time to see the fulfillment of God's promise. 

Then we made scrolls! I used a piece of legal paper since it is a bit longer than usual, and lined it with three columns. Then the girls wrote the prayer of St. Simeon as copy work, and decorated the borders of the paper. We slipped wooden beads on the ends of wooden skewers (with some glue to hold them in place), and then folded and taped the ends of the paper around the skewers. Then we practiced rolling and unrolling to read. We used this image as a suggestion. 

Download my lined legal paper scroll to make your own scroll. 


Scroll rolled up and tied